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Sytrinol™ Plus

A Natural Solution for Lowering Cholestrol

Suggested Retail Price:$34.95
Your Price:$26.21

According to the most recent statistics from the American Heart Association, cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a primary or contributing cause to more than 1.4 million deaths in the United States each year.

Cardiovascular disease has been the number 1 killer for the past 100 years and claims as many lives each year as the next 14 leading causes of death combined. According to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 61 million Americans currently suffer from cardiovascular disease.

Reducing serum cholesterol levels - especially low-density lipoprotein
(LDL) - has proven to be an effective medical strategy for preventing
cardiovascular disease and reducing coronary event s and When researchers examined responses gathered from 13,990 patients, however, they discovered that fewer than 4% of those diagnosed with hypercholesterolemia (elevated cholesterol) were taking vitamins, supplements or medications known to reduce cholesterol (Steyer, et al. 2003).

Contrary to popular belief, cholesterol consumed in food is minor compared to the amount of cholesterol produced in the body. Only 20% of cholesterol comes from the foods we eat and can be modestly influenced by dietary modification, while about 80% of is synthesized by the liver (Wald 1995). It is the rate-limiting enzyme HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A) reductase that controls the biosynthesis of cholesterol.

Modern dietary habits (such as excess intake of saturated and trans fatty acids) and life-style contribute to the disruption of this system, leading to elevated cholesterol levels and increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease. Additionally, certain genetic disorders, such as familial hypercholesterolemia and autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia, are known to increase LDL levels and risk for developing cardiovascular disease (Pullinger, Kane and Malloy 2003).
Sytrinoltm Plus A Patented Formula
Sytrinoltm is a patented proprietary formula derived from natural citrus and palm fruit extracts. Sytrinoltm combines citrus poly-methoxylated flavones (PMF) and palm tocotrienols, along with other proprietary constituents. The synergy of these ingredients has been shown in clinical trials to significantly:
• Lower Total Cholesterol
• Lower LDL Cholesterol
• Lower Triglyceride Levels.
• Increase HDL Cholesterol Levels
TRIPLE ACTION BREAKTHROUGH
Sytrinol has three different and complementary mechanisms of action in the body that deliver the heart health benefits:
• Polymethoxylated Bioflavonoids (PMF) decrease apoprotein b, a structural protein needed for endogenous synthesis of LDL cholesterol.
• PMF (tangeretin and nobiletin) decrease diacylglycerol acetyl transferase, a liver enzyme needed for endogenous synthesis of triglycerides.
• Tocotrienols degrade HMG coA reductase, a liver enzyme responsible for endogenous synthesis of cholesterol.

Polymethoxylated Flavones (PMF)
There has long been a connection between capillary health and bioflavonoids. The role of bioflavonoids in
maintaining a healthy capillary bed has long been viewed as critical to supporting the natural immune
mechanisms of body tissues.

Polymethoxylated flavones are a sub classification of citrus flavonoids that are highly methoxylated.
This process occurs naturally and results in a more biologically active molecule. This is especially true for
tangeretin and nobiletin, two of the primary polymethoxylated flavones in Sytrinoltm. There is over 25
years of documented research evidence that these particular bioflavonoids deliver heart health benefits,
including powerful antioxidant properties.

Inflammation is indicated as one of the main culprits in cardiovascular disease. Epidemiological studies
show that cardiovascular disease is affecting younger individuals, one third of those are in good health with
their cholesterol within normal ranges. Both men and women in this group can suffer from sudden heart
attacks with no warning signs or risk factors known to cause heart disease.

Recent Research indicates that inflammation may cause c-reactive protein (CRP) to be produced in the
body. Researchers have shown that the presence of CRP in the body is a more reliable predictor of a
pending heart attack than any other traditionally known risk factor for heart disease. PMF, including
tangeretin and nobiletin, have been studied for their antiinflammatory properties, suggesting that the PMF
found in Sytrinol would have a positive effect on CRP.

Tocotrienols
Tocotrienols, also a proprietary ingredient in Sytrinoltm, are naturally occurring analogues of tocopherol
(natural vitamin E) and are found mainly in palm oil and cereal grains. The tocotrienols in Sytrinoltm are
considered to be 40–60 times more potent in antioxidant activity than natural vitamin E.
Proven Benefits of Sytrinol™
Over 12 years of science and research focusing on the
relationship between poly-methoxylated flavonoids,
tocotrienols, and cardiovascular health have resulted in the
development of Sytrinoltm. The benefits of Sytrinoltm have been
shown in vitro, in vivo, and in multiple clinical studies.

In these studies, hypercholesterolemic subjects consumed 150 mg
of Sytrinol twice per day (300 mg/day) and were instructed to keep
the same dietary habits and maintain their caloric intake during the
study.

Fasting blood samples were drawn at the onset of the study and at
the end of four weeks for analysis of total cholesterol, LDL
cholesterol, apolipoproteins B (associated with LDL), apolipoproteins
A1 (associated with HDL), and total triglycerides.

The results of the clinical studies were all similar in their effect, with
an average reduction of total cholesterol by 25 percent, LDL
cholesterol by 23 percent and total triglycerides by 28 percent.

Additionally, the LDL/HDL ratio was significantly reduced in all
clinical studies by an average of 24 percent
There is significant on going research to support this extraordinary
patented formula.
Cholesterol and Human Health
Cholesterol is a fatty (lipid) component found in virtually all cell membranes. In addition to supporting cellular integrity,
cholesterol is also required for the transport of phospholipids and the biosynthesis of mineralocorticoids (aldosterone),
glucocorticoids (cortisol), and sex hormones (progesterone, pregnenolone, testosterone, and estradiol). Far from
endangering health, cholesterol is essential to life. In fact, Italian researchers have shown that when serum
cholesterol levels are too low (less than 160 mg/dL), mortality in older adults actually increases (Onder et
al.2003)(Brescianini et al. 2003).

LDL, popularly known as “bad cholesterol,” is the primary transporter of cholesterol in the blood. In atherosclerosis,
LDL is taken up in lesions in endothelial cells lining the inner walls of blood vessels, forming deposits in the arterial
walls. The deposited LDL undergoes modification, as free radicals oxidize LDL to form foam cells that create a thick,
hard plaque.

Over time, plaque accumulation can constrict vessels, inhibiting blood flow and reducing the supply of oxygen
reaching the heart, brain, and other organs (Brown et al. 2004). If a clot (thrombus) blocks an artery already
restricted by plaque, blood and oxygen flow can be cut off entirely, leading to a heart attack (if the occlusion occurs in
the heart) or a stroke (if it occurs in the brain).

HDL is commonly referred to as “good” cholesterol because it helps remove excess cholesterol from atherosclerotic
deposits and retard the growth of new plaque. Low HDL levels have been shown to be an additional risk factor for

increased mortality from coronary artery disease and strokes in the elderly(Weverling-Rijnsburger et al. 2003).

How the Body Manages Cholesterol Levels
Normally, the liver regulates cholesterol levels via a biochemical feedback loop. When cholesterol levels are low, liver
production of HMG-CoA reductase increases to speed biosynthesis of cholesterol. Conversely, when cholesterol levels
are too high, the liver limits HMG-CoA reductase production to reduce cholesterol production. Proper functioning of
this feedback mechanism is vital for the maintenance of healthy cholesterol levels.

Not All LDL Is Created Equal
To bind with other molecules for transport through the circulatory system, lipids rely on a specialized class of
structural proteins, called apoproteins. LDL exists in two versions, differentiated by their protein components. The first,
apolipoprotein A, consists of a large, “fluffy” protein called apoprotein A that is cardioprotective when bound to LDL.
The second, apolipoprotein B, consists of a small, dense protein called apoprotein B that plays a major role in
cardiovascular disease when bound to LDL. Apolipoprotein-B particles enable cholesterol to penetrate and lodge in
vascular walls, an important step in initiating the formation of atherosclerotic plaque (Gustafsson et al. 2004)..

Apo-lipoprotein B is the predominant form of apolipoprotein, and over 90% of all LDL cholesterol particles in the
blood carry apolipoprotein B, making it an especially accurate (and convenient) marker for measuring the cholesteroldepositing
capacity of blood (Cabezas and Liem 2003) (Walldius and Jungner 2004,1188-94)(Walldius and Jungner
2004,118-205).

The importance of apolipoprotein B was highlighted in a report published in 2001 in the British medical journal The
Lancet. In the AMORIS study, researchers evaluated cardiovascular markers in over 175,000 men and women over a
period of five and a half years. In addition to conventional lipid markers, such as triglycerides, total cholesterol, and
LDL:HDL ratios, the researchers also measured apolipoprotein-B levels. Their findings revealed that those with the
highest ratios of apolipoprotein B to apolipoprotein A were at the greatest risk of dying from a heart attack (Walldius et
al. 2001).

These findings were supported by a second study, published in 2003 in the journal Circulation. In the IRAS study,
researchers again measured apolipoprotein-B levels in 1,522 individuals and compared them with an array of
standard lipid markers (such as C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, and carotid artery intima-media thickness) to assess
cardiovascular disease risks. They found that elevated apolipoprotein-B levels were strongly associated with
cardiovascular disease, and concluded that apolipoprotein-B levels are a better predictor of vascular risk than are LDL
levels (Williams et al. 2003)

Given the well-documented link between apolipoprotein B and cardiovascular disease, measuring apolipoprotein-B
levels offers clinicians and patients a new, highly specific marker for assessing the precise level of LDL in serum and
determining individual risk for developing cardiovascular disease.
Information contained in this bulletin is for informational and educational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advise from your physician. This information should not be used for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem. You should consult with a health care professional for treatment of any health issue. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA.
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WoodAW, ConneyAH. Activationand
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metabolism in human liver microsomes by
naturally occurring flavonoid. Cancer Res. 1981
Jan;41(1):67-72.

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apolipoprotein B in clinical practice to
determine the risk for atherosclerosis. Ned
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HK, Dexter DT. Tissue distribution and
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Neuroreport. 2001 Dec 4;12(17):3871-5.

Firenzuoli F, Gori L, Crupi A, Neri D. Flavonoids:
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Information contained in this bulletin is for informational and educational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advise from your physician. This information should not be used for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem. You should consult with a health care professional for treatment of any health issue.