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MIGRABALANCE™

A Dietary Supplement Supporting Cerebrovascular Tone

Suggested Retail Price:$24.95
Your Price:$18.71

MigraBalance™ is a unique combination of herbal and nutritional supplements aimed at supporting natural cerebrovascular tone and pro-inflammatory mediators.

• Formulated by leading researchers in the field of natural medicine and clinical nutrition.
• Utilizes the latest research of dietary supplements for the support of cerebrovascular tone†.
• Provides the health care professional a valuable tool for patients seeking a dietary supplement to help support normal cerebrovascular tone.

Recommendations
Take one capsule once or twice daily to provide optimal nutrient levels and benefits.
Nutritional Management of Migraine Headaches
Dr. Larry J. Milam, H.M.D., Ph.D.

¨ More than 23 million people in the United States suffer from migraine headaches.
¨ Approximately 75% of all those who experience migraines are women.
¨ The prevalence of migraines appears to be similar for boys and girls in the prepubescent years.
¨ In adolescents, the prevalence of migraines is higher in adolescent girls than in boys of similar age.
¨ By early adulthood, migraines are three times as frequent in women as in men.

The Anatomy of a Typical Migraine
The typical migraine headache is throbbing or pulsatile. It is initially unilateral and localized in the front temporal and ocular area. It builds up over a period of 1-2 hours, progressing posteriorly and becoming diffuse. It typically lasts from several hours to a whole day. Pain intensity is moderate to severe, intensifying with routine physical activity.

• The attack commonly occurs when the patient is already awake, although it may have already started upon awakening. Less commonly, a migraine may awaken the patient at night.
• Eighty percent (80%) of migraines are accompanied with nausea and vomiting which usually occur later in the attack. Fifty percent (50%) of these headaches are accompanied with food intolerance. Some patients become pale and clammy, especially if nausea develops.
• Photophobia and or phonophobia are also commonly associated with the headache.
What Triggers a Migraine?
Any number of things can trigger a migraine in a susceptible individual.
Some of the most noted causes are:
• Allergies • Constipation • Stress
• Liver Malfunction • Sun glare • Flashing light
• Lack of exercise • Dental problems • Changes in barometric pressure
• High dietary fat intake • Hormonal changes • Consumption of food with tyramine
• Low blood sugar
Two of the most noted causes of
migraines are:

Hormonal changes.
Fluctuations in the level of the hormone estrogen during the menstrual cycle have been linked to the onset of migraines. Headaches greatly decrease after menopause. Women who suffer from hormonal changes may benefit from the use of a natural progesterone crème.

Low Blood Sugar
Studies have shown that blood sugar levels are low during a migraine attack, and the lower the blood sugar level, the more severe the headache.

These primary causes are compounded at the onset of menstruation when women commonly experience low blood sugar.
The Five Phases of a Migraine
1. A day before the onset of a headache, there may be detectable changes in mood, problems with memory, an alternation in one or all the five senses, or speech problems.
2. Just before the headache begins, some people see flashes or patterns of light and/or experience numbness of the hands and mouth. This is called an aura, much like auras that effect many people with epilepsy. A migraine preceded by an aura is called a Classic Migraine. Migraines without auras are called Common Migraines.
3. The headache starts with severe, throbbing pain. It may occur on one side or on both sides of the head. The pain can also move from side to side. Nausea may set in, along with tenderness in the neck and scalp. The eyes may be very sensitive to light and the person may be almost immobilized by the pain.
4. The headache dissipates, however, nausea may linger.
5. The person may feel tired and lethargic and may simply want to sleep.
Dietary Links to Migraines
The mechanisms that trigger migraine headaches are not fully and clearly understood. While many are traced to foods, a food that is implicated in one individual may not trigger an attack in another. Further complicating this link, food tolerance thresholds vary with time and usage.

• Foods commonly associated with the onset of migraines include citrus fruits, tea, coffee, pork, chocolate, milk, nuts, and cola drinks.
• Substances causing modifications in vascular tone are tyramine, phenylalanine, phenolic flavors, alcohol, food additives (sodium nitrate, monosodium glutamate), aspartame and caffeine.
• Foods that trigger migraines subsequent to hypoglycemia have been identified as: chocolate, cheese, citrus fruits, bananas, nuts, cured meats, dairy product, cereals, beans, hot dogs, pizza, food additives, coffee, tea, cola drinks, and alcoholic drinks, such as red wine, beer, or whiskey distilled in copper stills. (Leira and Rodriquez, 1996; American Diabetes Association, 1993)

Nutritional Recommendations
1. Rule out food sensitivities that maybe contributing to migraine headaches.
Early studies have suggested that about 30-40% of migraineurs benefit markedly by avoiding certain foods. The results of four double blind studies support the role of food in causing migraines. Most foods that provoke migraines are commonly eaten, but often not recognized as the cause. Dietary restrictions of these foods and others that are known or suspected to initiate migraines may be required as part of a treatment protocol. To identify the offending foods, eliminate them from the diet and reintroduce them one by one to determine their effect. A nutritional advisor, health care professional or dietitian can offer alternative food suggestions to insure that healthful nutritional levels are maintained.

2. Avoid dietary amines. Foods such as chocolate, cheese, citrus, and alcohol contain amines (i.e. betaphenylethylamine and tyramine) known to cause vasoconstriction either directly or indirectly through the liberation of catecholamines.

3. Reduce arachidonic acid, found in a disproportionate amount of omega-6 oils in the diet, such as corn oil and many high temperature frying oils. Arachidonic acid can increase platelet aggregation, increase histamine release and increase inflammation associated with migraines.

4. Increase consumption of essential fatty acids, especially omega-3 fatty acids. This will decrease platelet aggregation and change the membrane composition to more of the unsaturated acids. New Spirit Naturals offers several choices: Golden Omega-OmegaTM, New Life 1000TM, Life EssentialsTM, and Omega Cranberry Snack.

The Five Phases of a Migraine
1. A day before the onset of a headache, there may be detectable changes in mood, problems with memory, an alternation in one or all the five senses, or speech problems.

2. Just before the headache begins, some people see flashes or patterns of light and/or experience numbness of the hands and mouth. This is called an aura, much like auras that effect many people with epilepsy. A migraine preceded by an aura is called a Classic Migraine. Migraines without auras are called Common Migraines.

3. The headache starts with severe, throbbing pain. It may occur on one side or on both sides of the head. The pain can also move from side to side. Nausea may set in, along with tenderness in the neck and scalp. The eyes may be very sensitive to light and the person may be almost immobilized by the pain.

4. The headache dissipates, however, nausea may linger.

5. The person may feel tired and lethargic and may simply want to sleep.

5. Increase fiber and complex carbohydrates. High fiber vegetables, whole grains and NutriCleanse™! will increase the number of bowel movements and decrease bowel transit time, alleviating constipation and blood sugar imbalances.

6. Consume a low fat, high complex carbohydrate diet. A study conducted by Dr. Zuzana Bic, at the Loma Linda School of Public Health, 1994-1996, showed that a low-fat, high complex carbohydrate diet can dramatically lower the frequency, intensity, and duration of migraine headaches and, consequently, reduce the usage of pain medications.

One of the most important contributions of the study was to identify increased levels of blood fat as a common denominator of primary headaches. The objective was to reduce fat consumption to 20 to 30 grams per day, or approximately 10 to 15% of total calories.
Results of the study: • Decreased headache frequency of nearly 71%
• Decreased migraine intensity by about 66%
• Decreased migraine duration by about 74%
• Decreased pain medication usage by 72%
• More that 94% of all participants reported at least 40% improvement,
while only 6% reported little or no noticeable improvement.
7. Add De-Oiled Lecithin to your diet as a natural source of choline. Red blood cell choline levels may be different in patients with cluster headaches. In a study of cluster headaches, the RBC choline concentration of patients suffering from cluster headaches was compared to age-related controls. The RBC choline concentration was reported to be low in patients during and between cluster periods. During lithium treatment, choline levels rose 78 times. (de Belleroche, 1984)

Recommended: De-Oiled Lecithin; Green MagicTM

8. Take 1 or 2 capsules daily of MigraBalance™. MIGRABALANCE™ has been formulated as a dietary supplement for the support of healthy cerebrovascular tone.† (Mansfield, 1988}
MIGRABALANCETM Contains All Natural Ingredients:
Tanacetum parthenium (feverfew.)
50 mg. standardized extract
Feverfew is a natural botanical commonly
recommended to support cerebrovascular tone.†
It contains compounds known as sesquiterpene
lactones. The most common of these is
parthenolides which represent about 85% of the
sesquiterpene lactone content in feverfew leaf extracts.
The tanacetum parthenium used in MIGRABALANCE™ is
standardized to a high parthenolides content of 0.7%.
Standardization insures the optimal level of parthenolides.
• Scientific studies have demonstrated that parthenolides inhibits platelet aggregation and the release of serotonin from platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocule granules.†
• In addition, feverfew has been shown to inhibit pro-inflammatory prostaglandin synthesis and the release of arachidonic acid.†
• European studies have shown that standardized feverfew extract is beneficial in the long-term support of cerebrovascular tone.†
• Tanacetum parthenium has been shown to inhibit the
secretion of serotonin and other platelet granule constituents, decrease smooth muscle response to endogenous substances (norepinephrine, acetylcholine, bradykinin, prostaglandins, histamine, and serotonin), and inhibit the production of inflammatory substances (leukotrienes, thromboxanes). (Marz,1999)
• Researchers found that 70% of 270 migraine sufferers who had taken feverfew daily for prolonged periods of time had both decreased frequency and severity of migraine headaches. (Johnson, 1985)
Magnesium Amino Acid Chelate (200 mg.)
Magnesium is a nutritional dietary supplement that
supports vascular tone in several ways:†
• Inhibition of vasospasm.
• Direct alternations of cerebrovascular tone.
• Stabilization of cell membranes.
• Interference with synthesis, release and actions of
inflammatory mediations.
• Inhibition of platelet aggregation.
Some studies of persons with poor cerebrovascular tone have been shown to have low brain levels of magnesium.†
Magnesium supplementation may help compensate
for this deficiencies.†
Daily Recommendation: 400 to 800 mg. per day
(supplement and dietary source). (Schoenen,1991)
(Cephalagia, 1991)
Magnesium helps prevent release of catecholamines,
which is an important mediator of platelet aggregation.
In one study (Schoenen, 1991), it was found that
patients without auras had a significant reduction in
RBC magnesium compared to sufferers with auras.
No difference was seen in serum magnesium.
Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) 200 mg.
This B vitamin is a precursor of flavinadenine dinucleotide (FAD), an important coenzyme component of the electron-transport chain. A deficiency of mitochondrial energy reserves has been observed in some persons exhibiting poor cerebrovascular tone.

In some clinical trials, riboflavin seems to reduce the pain and frequency of migraine. Fifty nine percent (59%) of patients receiving riboflavin improved by at least 50%. (Holroyd, 2003)

Dulse (10 mg)
Palmaria palmata is red seaweed grown in the cold waters surrounding Grand Manan Island, located off the south coast of New Brunswick. Dulse is a natural detoxifying vegetable which provides a primary source of essential vitamins, particularly the B vitamins, minerals, protein, and trace elements, including lithium.
In his book, Medical Nutrition from Marz, Dr. Russell Marz, a Naturopathic physician, indicates that lithium from food sources may be useful in acute attack cluster headaches.†

Additional research shows that lithium may reduce cluster headaches and the cyclic form of migraines. (Solomon, 1991) (Yung, 1984)

Ginger (Zingiber officinale) 10 mg
Ginger root contains the active components gingerols, zingerone and shogaols, compounds which are antioxidants.
More than 80% of migraine patients report nausea and up to 50% report vomiting. Experts agree that ginger is a highly effective anti-nausea agent (Web MD, 2002)

The Lancet, a highly respected British Medical Journal, reported excellent results in scientific testing using ginger to treat nausea. The powdered rhizome of Zingiber officinale has been found to be more effective than dimenhydrinate (Dramamine) in reducing motion sickness in individuals highly susceptible to this malady. (Mowrey , 1982)
These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
Contraindications, Adverse Reactions or Interactions Side effects due to any of the natural ingredients in MIGRABALANCE™ are rare. Mild gastrointestinal upset and/or loose stools may occur in some people using magnesium. This product is not recommended for use during pregnancy or lactation and should not be used in children
under the age of two years. Persons taking potassium-sparing diuretics or with renal failure should not use this product.

Note: Due to the high levels of riboflavin (vitamin B2), urine may turn a bright yellow color.
Selected References
Bic, Zuzana, at the Loma Linda School of Public Health (1994-1996).
Brown, D, Gaby, A, Reichert, R, Clinical Applications of Natural
Medicine-Migraine NPRC Condition-Specific Monograph Series, 1997.
de Belleroche, J, et al, Erythrocyte Choline Concentration and
Cluster Headache. Br Med J. 288:268-70, 1984.
Heptinstalls, White, A, et al, Extracts of Feverfew inhibit granule
secretion in blood platelets and polymorphonuclear
leukocytes. Lancet, 1:1071-74, 1985.
Holroyd, Kenneth A, Mauskup, Alexander, Neurology 2003: 60
(Supplement 2): 858-862.
Solomon S S, Lipton R B, Newman L C, Prophylactic Therapy of
Cluster Headaches. Clin. Neuropharmacol, 1492: 116-30, 1991.
Johnson, E, Kadam, Hylands and Hylands, Efficacy of feverfew as
prophylactic treatment of migraine. British Med. J. 5619-73, 1985.
Makhejaan, Bailey J M, A platelet phospholipase inhibitor from
the medicinal herb feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium).
Prostagland Leukotriedes Med. 1982:8:653-60.
Mansfield, L E, Food Allergy and Migraine: Whom to evaluate
and how to treat. Postgrad Med, 83(7):46 55, 1988.
Marz, Russell B, Medical Nutrition From Marz, 2nd Edition, (A
textbook in clinical nutrition), Omni Press, 1999. p. 164-165.
Morgan, K C, Wright, J L C, and Simpson, F J, 1980 Review of Chemical Constituents of the Red Algae Palmaria palmate (Dulse). Econ Bot 34:27-50.
Mowrey and Clayson, The Lancet, 1982.
Linde, A, et al, Low brain magnesium in migraine headache.
1989:29:590-93.
Schoenen et al, Effectiveness of high-dose riboflavin in migraine prophylaxis: A randomized controlled trial. Neurology
50:446, 1998.
Schoenen, J, Lenarrts, M and Bastings, E, High-dose Riboflavin
as a prophylactic treatment of migraine: Results of an open
pilot study. Cephalagia, 14:328-29, 1994.
Schoenen, J, et al, Blood magnesium levels in migraines.
Cephalagia 97-99, 1991.
Solomon, S S, Lipton, R B, Newman, L C, Prophylactic Therapy of
Cluster Headaches. Clin. Neuropharmacol 1492): 116-30, 1991.
Yung, Cy, A Review of Clinical Trials of Lithium in Neurology.
Pharmacol Biochem 21 Suppl:57-64, 1984.
Information contained in this bulletin is for informational and educational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advise from your physician. This information should not be used for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem. You should consult with a health care professional for treatment of any health issue.